It's easier than you think to help find ways to cure, prevent and treat type 1 diabetes.

Researchers all over Australia are running clinical trials for type 1 diabetes. If you would like to participate or learn more about one of these trials, use our clinical trial finder below. 

These are the current clinical trials in your state. If none of these are suited to you at this point, sign up to become a T1D Game Changer, and we'll keep you updated as to when new trial oppurtunities arise. 

Researchers: Submit your clinical research project on our trial finder.

Australian Capital Territory | New South Wales | Northern Territory | Queensland | South Australia | Tasmania | Victoria | Western Australia

 Photo: The Salmon family of New South Wales. Max (age 6) was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2010.

Trial Finder:

Australian Capital Territory

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Inclusion criteria:  Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

 

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

New South Wales

Investigation of a closed loop device for adults with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system vs. standard treatment on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Adults (25-70 years) with T1D treated via multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Melissa Lee, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne on 03 9231 2211 or melissa.lee@svha.org.au  

Investigation of a closed loop device for young people with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy  range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system (Medtronic Minimed 670G) vs. standard treatment (current pump or multiple daily injections with or without continuous glucose monitoring) on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Aged 12-25 years with T1D (duration >1 year) treated with either multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Charles Czank, Telethon Kid's Institute Perth on 08 9340 7858 or charles.czank@health.wa.gov.au

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Inclusion criteria:  Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)

ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research.

Inclusion criteria: Children, adolescents and young adults with T1D

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity (ENDIA)

The ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) study is looking into what contributes to the development of Type 1 Diabetes in early childhood. Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. This is because our environment has changed and predisposed children are more likely to develop Type 1 Diabetes. If we can understand exactly what in the environment is harmful or protective, we can develop strategies to prevent Type 1 Diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Women who are pregnant with a baby that will have a first-degree relative with T1D
  • Newborn babies less than 6-months old with a first-degree relative with T1D

Find out more.

Cord Reinfusion in Diabetes (CORD) Pilot Study

Cell Care is partnering with The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, NSW, in a world–first trial investigating the potential of cord blood to prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in high risk children.

Find out more by contacting Phuong Phan
Email: cord.schn@health.nsw.gov.au
Telephone: 02 9845 1233

The Clinical Utility of Glycated Albumin as an Index of Glycaemic Control in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy and its ability to predict Neonatal Outcome

High birth weight is a common and important complication of type 1 diabetes in pregnancy, with adverse consequences for both mother and baby. Accurate determination of glycaemic control remains difficult due to limitations of current testing methods and parameters.  

This study is investigating the use of glycated albumin for monitoring glycaemic control in pregnancy, a test which has the potential to be more accurate, widely accessible and cost effective.

Inclusion criteria: Females aged over 18 with type 1 diabetes, pregnant and at 11-18 weeks gestation.

Contact details: Dr Rachel McGrath at Royal North Shore Hospital on 02 9463 1470, or rachel.mcgrath@health.nsw.gov.au

Find out more

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children 

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

Northern Territory

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Inclusion criteria:  Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children 

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

Queensland

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Inclusion criteria:  Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)

The ADDN project will build a national picture of young type 1 diabetes patients by capturing de-identified patient population data from newly diagnosed children and children with established type 1 diabetes. ADDN connects diabetes data from specialist centres across Australia and New Zealand on a single platform. This study is administered by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG), which is an organisation representing health professionals caring for children with diabetes.

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity (ENDIA)

The ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) study is looking into what contributes to the development of Type 1 Diabetes in early childhood. Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. This is because our environment has changed and predisposed children are more likely to develop Type 1 Diabetes. If we can understand exactly what in the environment is harmful or protective, we can develop strategies to prevent Type 1 Diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Women who are pregnant with a baby that will have a first-degree relative with T1D
  • Newborn babies less than 6-months old with a first-degree relative with T1D

Find out more.

Efficacy of the Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) for parents of young children with type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is associated with higher rates of behavioural and emotional problems, which can persist into adulthood. Parents of children with diabetes are often unsure about what is appropriate for their child, and struggle with incorporating tasks into their day-to-day routines.

This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a brief, group-based parenting intervention for parents of children with type 1 diabetes, and its potential to lead to improved child behavioural and emotional adjustment, better family wellbeing, and healthier children.

Inclusion criteria: Families with a 2 - 10 year old child with type 1 diabetes

Contact details: Aditi Lohan at the University of Qld on 07 3365 7689 or aditi.lohan@uqconnect.edu.au

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children 

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

South Australia

Investigation of a closed loop device for adults with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system vs. standard treatment on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Adults (25-70 years) with T1D treated via multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Melissa Lee, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne on 03 9231 2211 or melissa.lee@svha.org.au  

Investigation of a closed loop device for young people with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy  range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system (Medtronic Minimed 670G) vs. standard treatment (current pump or multiple daily injections with or without continuous glucose monitoring) on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Aged 12-25 years with T1D (duration >1 year) treated with either multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Charles Czank, Telethon Kid's Institute Perth on 08 9340 7858 or charles.czank@health.wa.gov.au

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)

The ADDN project will build a national picture of young type 1 diabetes patients by capturing de-identified patient population data from newly diagnosed children and children with established type 1 diabetes. ADDN connects diabetes data from specialist centres across Australia and New Zealand on a single platform. This study is administered by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG), which is an organisation representing health professionals caring for children with diabetes.

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity (ENDIA)

The ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) study is looking into what contributes to the development of Type 1 Diabetes in early childhood. Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. This is because our environment has changed and predisposed children are more likely to develop Type 1 Diabetes. If we can understand exactly what in the environment is harmful or protective, we can develop strategies to prevent Type 1 Diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Women who are pregnant with a baby that will have a first-degree relative with T1D
  • Newborn babies less than 6-months old with a first-degree relative with T1D

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children 

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

Tasmania

Investigation of a closed loop device for adults with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system vs. standard treatment on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Adults (25-70 years) with T1D treated via multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Melissa Lee, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne on 03 9231 2211 or melissa.lee@svha.org.au  

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Inclusion criteria:  Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

Victoria

Investigation of a closed loop device for adults with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system vs. standard treatment on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Adults (25-70 years) with T1D treated via multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Melissa Lee, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne on 03 9231 2211 or melissa.lee@svha.org.au  

Investigation of a closed loop device for young people with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy  range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system (Medtronic Minimed 670G) vs. standard treatment (current pump or multiple daily injections with or without continuous glucose monitoring) on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Aged 12-25 years with T1D (duration >1 year) treated with either multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Charles Czank, Telethon Kid's Institute Perth on 08 9340 7858 or charles.czank@health.wa.gov.au

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)

The ADDN project will build a national picture of young type 1 diabetes patients by capturing de-identified patient population data from newly diagnosed children and children with established type 1 diabetes. ADDN connects diabetes data from specialist centres across Australia and New Zealand on a single platform. This study is administered by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG), which is an organisation representing health professionals caring for children with diabetes.

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity (ENDIA)

The ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) study is looking into what contributes to the development of Type 1 Diabetes in early childhood. Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. This is because our environment has changed and predisposed children are more likely to develop Type 1 Diabetes. If we can understand exactly what in the environment is harmful or protective, we can develop strategies to prevent Type 1 Diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Women who are pregnant with a baby that will have a first-degree relative with T1D
  • Newborn babies less than 6-months old with a first-degree relative with T1D

Find out more.

Comparison of renal function in pregnant women with and without diabetes

Find out more by emailing: jmseah@gmail.com
Telephone: 0412 931 059

Empagliflozin to reduce insulin use in recently diagnosed diabetes

Empagliflozin has been used for over a decade to treat type 2 diabetes and, more recently, has been shown to lower insulin requirements in people with long-standing type 1 diabetes. This trial will test whether empagliflozin helps reduce insulin requirements and preserves pancreas function in people with newly diagnosed diabetes. It is taken as a table once a day with food. The trial is sponsored by Melbourne Health and is based at the Royal Melbourne Hospital.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Recent diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (within 100 days)
  • Age 18 to 40

Contact details: Dr John Wentworth at Royal Melbourne Hospital on 03 9342 7063 or wentworth@wehi.edu.au

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children 

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

Western Australia

Investigation of a closed loop device for adults with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system vs. standard treatment on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Adults (25-70 years) with T1D treated via multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Melissa Lee, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne on 03 9231 2211 or melissa.lee@svha.org.au  

Investigation of a closed loop device for young people with type 1 diabetes 

A hybrid closed loop system  provides automated control of basal insulin delivery, offering the potential to reduce glucose variability outside of the healthy  range compared with standard treatment. This study will explore the use of a hybrid closed loop system (Medtronic Minimed 670G) vs. standard treatment (current pump or multiple daily injections with or without continuous glucose monitoring) on health outcomes and quality of life.

Inclusion criteria:  Aged 12-25 years with T1D (duration >1 year) treated with either multiple daily injections or an insulin pump and with HbA1c <10.5%

Contact details: Dr Charles Czank, Telethon Kid's Institute Perth on 08 9340 7858 or charles.czank@health.wa.gov.au

The fenofibrate and microvascular events in type 1 diabetes (FAME 1) eye study

The FAME 1 Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in type 1 diabetes. 

Adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy

Contact details: Prof Alicia Jenkins and Prof Anthony Keech at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre on 1800 158 629 or fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Find out more.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)

The ADDN project will build a national picture of young type 1 diabetes patients by capturing de-identified patient population data from newly diagnosed children and children with established type 1 diabetes. ADDN connects diabetes data from specialist centres across Australia and New Zealand on a single platform. This study is administered by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG), which is an organisation representing health professionals caring for children with diabetes.

Find out more.

TrialNet studies to prevent type 1 diabetes

Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Individuals aged 1-45 with an immediate family member with T1D
  • Individuals aged 1-20 with an extended family member with T1D

Contact details: Felicity Healy and Leanne Redl at Melbourne Health: 03 9342 7063, felicity.healy@mh.org.au or leanne.redl@mh.org.au

Find out more.

Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity (ENDIA)

The ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) study is looking into what contributes to the development of Type 1 Diabetes in early childhood. Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. This is because our environment has changed and predisposed children are more likely to develop Type 1 Diabetes. If we can understand exactly what in the environment is harmful or protective, we can develop strategies to prevent Type 1 Diabetes.

Inclusion criteria:

  • Women who are pregnant with a baby that will have a first-degree relative with T1D
  • Newborn babies less than 6-months old with a first-degree relative with T1D

Find out more.

The effect of work and family conflict on quality of life of parents and children 

This study will investigate how work-family conflict affects quality of life for children living with a chronic illness like type 1 diabetes and their parents.  We are especially interested in how these challenges are faced, and if any differences exist between these parents and those of children without a chronic illness.

Inclusion criteria: Australian parents of a child aged 5-12 years, working at least 2 days per week. Parents of children with type 1 diabetes, asthma, eczema or no health conditions are eligible to participate.

Contact details:  Antonia Kish at the University of Queensland on 0733657171 or antonia.kish@uqconnect.edu.au

The benefits of sprinting for improving blood glucose management in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus 

The aim of this study is to find out whether adding short sprints to exercise in real-life improves blood glucose management in people with type 1 diabetes. Participants will wear a blinded blood glucose sensor to monitor levels, and an Actiheart device to measure activity and heart rate. Participants will take turns at completing 2 week blocks of physical activity: following their normal routine, incorporating 10 sec sprints, and 4 second sprints.

Inclusion criteria: Adolescents and young adults with T1DM (aged between 14 and 35 years old) who participate in sustained physical activity at least 3 times per week, will be recruited into the study.

Contact details:  Dr Tarini Chetty at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Perth on 08 6229 3322 or Tarini.Chetty@health.wa.gov.au

Exercise Performance in Hyperglycaemia  

This study aims to determine if exercise performance in people with type 1 diabetes is affectedby exercising with a high, compared to a normal, blood sugar. For testing, drips are inserted; one for blood sampling and another for infusing insulin and glucose. A blood sugar of 5 or 17 mmol/Lis targeted. Participants undertake exercise tasks – bike sprints, grip strength, balancing, jumping, reaction time and a cycle fitness test.

Inclusion criteria: Adolescents and young adults (aged 14 – 26 years of age) with type 1 diabetes of more than oneyear duration and a HbA1c of <9% who do not have any illness or injury which would limit their ability to exercise.

Contact details:  Dr Karen Rothacker at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Perth on 08 9340 8744 or karen.rothacker@health.wa.gov.au

Can protein intake after exercise decrease the risk of delayed low blood glucose levels after exercise?   

This study aims to determine if having protein after evening exercise affects the amount of carbohydrates needed to prevent hypoglycaemia during the night. The 1st 1.5h visit is for fitness testing. The second two are clamp studies, where you will have lunch at 12pm, exercise at 4pm and have either a protein drink/water at 8pm. Your BGL is kept within normal range with i.v. glucose. You will sleep over and the study ends at 6am the next day.

Inclusion criteria: - Diagnosed with T1DM for 1 or more years,- Physically active male and female participants aged between 13 and 25 years old,- Mean glycated haemoglobin levels <9% over the last year,- Free from any clinical evidence of macrovascular, microvascular or neurological complications associated with T1D, and-Treated with insulin pump or multiple daily injections.

Contact details:  Niru Paramalingam at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Perth on 08 9340 8671 or niru.paramalingam@health.wa.gov.au

Acute Hyperglycaemia in Type 1 Diabetes?   

Is short exposure to high blood glucose bad for you? Maybe not, according to The University of Western Australia. Researchers have found that a short rise in blood glucose does not increase levels of free radicals and now aim to understand these findings. They are looking for people with type 1diabetes aged 18-35 to take part in their study.

Inclusion criteria: Aged 18 - 35 years old.

Contact details:  Beth Fisher (0430027 399) Kate Sherwood (0474 635 528 or 21498924@student.uwa.edu.au) or Professor PaulFournier (08 6488 1356 or paul.fournier@uwa.edu.au)